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Flu Season: This year could be one of the worst

Flu Season:  This year could be one of the worst

Unfortunately, the 2019-2020 flu season is predicted to be one of the worst of the past 10 years, and this makes keeping a healthy office environment a number one priority.

A person can get the flu by touching a surface or object that has the flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes. Many people with the virus can be contagious the day before their symptoms begin, and some can be infected and spread the virus without ever becoming ill themselves.1

Help prevent the spread of the flu virus and other infectious diseases in your office by following these simple but effective procedures.

Routine cleaning and disinfecting

The flu virus can live and potentially infect a person for two to eight hours after being deposited on a surface.2 Flu viruses are relatively fragile,  so standard cleaning and disinfecting practices are sufficient to remove or kill them. The key is to maintain a consistent cleaning and disinfecting routine.

Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that are touched often

Germs and viruses are spread by human touch, so any surfaces and objects in your office that are often touched require daily cleaning and sanitizing. These include computer keyboards, phones, door handles, faucet taps, banisters, desks, countertops—anywhere frequent hand contact occurs that can contribute to the spread of infectious disease.

Remove waste regularly

It’s important to empty and sanitize waste baskets daily because personal items such as tissues and paper towels can harbor bacteria, germs and viruses.

Vacuum and clean carpets

Regular vacuuming and deep cleaning of carpets during flu season can help reduce the spread of germs and pathogens, and also improves indoor air quality.

 

Keep office chairs and upholstered furniture clean

Upholstered furniture can also hold germs and viruses and therefore needs regular deep cleaning and anti-bacterial fabric protection.

 

1, 2 Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention